The data on your phone was encrypted, and the SIM card was PIN-protected when it went lost. Then:

Mark the phone as lost with the Find My Device (Android) or Find My (iOS) feature, and the device will display an on-screen message with the phone number of a friend or relative who can contact you if someone honest discovers it.

After you've waited as long as you feel comfortable with the first step, remotely erase all data on the device and call your operator to have the SIM card blocked.

Purchase a new smartphone and restore your data from a previous backup.

After the theft, we recommend that you remain watchful. Thieves frequently make use of that information, particularly in the case of credit cards. take advantage of the contact information, especially on more expensive devices, and employ social engineering to persuade the owner of the stolen device to give their Google or Apple ID account password. If they are successful, they will be able to unlink the device from the account and sell the phone in its entirety rather than disassembling it and selling the pieces.

In short, be suspicious of any texts or phone calls relating to a stolen phone, and never enter or divulge your Google account or Apple ID credentials.

Worst-case scenario

Time is of the essence of the smartphone falls into the wrong hands and isn't protected, potentially even by a screen lock. The first thing you'll need is a second phone to make several phone calls from. Request the use of a phone from a business or restaurant employee, or hail a cab and take the driver's phone.

Block your SIM card

Your initial call should be to your service provider. Tell the customer service representative that you've misplaced your SIM card and that you'd like it blocked. The thief will be unable to impersonate you once the SIM card has been disabled (call from your number or receive a text message with a verification code for changing a password or confirming a transaction, for example).

Notify family and friends.

Your second call should be to a family member or a friend. Explain that your phone was stolen, and ask them to notify any mutual connections who may get calls or texts from your number requesting money or asking inquiries, which they should ignore. You might wish to request that they issue a social media warning. if you have a large number of pals there.

Block smartphone

To ban your stolen smartphone, you'll need Internet connectivity. Do so on a secure device if at all possible; you'll be inputting your password.

To begin, go to your Google or Apple ID account and log in. It may be difficult to log in from someone else's smartphone if you have two-factor authentication enabled. Your phone is obviously gone, therefore you can't obtain a verification text or use a mobile authenticator app. Android users can update their passwords without having to send a text message. If this is the case, enter one of the backup codes you were given when you set up two-factor authentication. iPhone users can regain account access by following the steps below. receiving a verification code by text message to a trusted phone number or device

Here's what to do once you've logged into your Google or Apple ID account:

Find your missing smartphone in the device list under Security (for Android phones) or the Find My iPhone app (for iPhones) and search for it in the device list.

Make a note of where the smartphone is on the map. The location icon should appear if the phone is turned on and geolocation is enabled. Even if the thief's path is obvious, do not try to catch up with them. Rather, seek assistance from the police.

Select the Lost Mode option. The system will prompt you to enter a lock screen message as well as a backup phone number. That message will now be the only thing displayed on your smartphone. The finder will be able to contact you if the phone was merely lost and not stolen. Keep an eye out for phishing emails and phone calls; thieves may masquerade as help representatives and contact you in an attempt to obtain your account password. If your device contains essential and sensitive information, consider wiping it remotely. Keep in mind, though, that this selection is final — and it also means giving up the ability to track the phone remotely.

Unlink bank cards

Apple or Google may recommend unlinking any linked cards when you block your smartphone with Find My or Find My Device, but if it doesn't, unlink bank cards from your device directly in the account settings. You don't need to disable the cards unless they were taken along with the phone.

For Android smartphones, follow these steps:

Sign in to your Google account; click Payment settings from the Payments & subscriptions area; and then remove your cards.

For iPhone users:

Sign in to your Apple ID account; locate the missing iPhone in the Devices section and click Remove all cards.

The IMEI number of the smartphone should be blocked.

In some countries, you can add a stolen phone's identifying number (IMEI) to the carrier's blocklist in addition to the SIM card. You must provide this number to the courier in order to do so. The number can be found on the box in which the phone was delivered if you have it.

You may find the IMEI on Android by using the Find your phone feature: The IMEI code will appear when you click on the circular I next to the image of your phone.

By entering in using the Apple ID used on the stolen device, scrolling down to Devices, then choosing the iPhone to discover its IMEI, iPhone users can find theirs at appleid.apple.com.

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