Now we are in the modern world, we approach countless websites with many terms. Many people haven’t sometimes been confused by these terms?  To help you understand all terms: Registered Users, Subscribers, and Logins, we write this post.

Login and Registration Example

Login

Login is a default feature that allows workspace access for users that have been invited to the workspace by an admin.

Login simply means to validate the user like authenticating the user. It means the user is identified and authenticated to access the website or a program where he/she is already registered. Login works both in web portals and web applications. In simple terms, it means to open a session with an already created account. For example, you can log in to your Gmail using your credentials meaning you have already created an account with Gmail, and your email ID and password are saved with them. By logging in what you simply did is authenticate yourself to gain access to your Gmail account. It is just an action that identifies you as a returning user rather than sees you as a new user, in which case you have to sign up. Though sign-in and login are often used interchangeably, login has more of a technical connotation. Login is to verify yourself to gain access to a website that has a different interface as a guest. However, some websites cannot be accessed via a guest account. For example, Facebook does not allow you to log in if you are a guest. On the other hand, sign-in authenticates the user even as a guest, meaning you can access the website even with the guest account without actually signing in.

For example, Google allows you to access the search engine without the need to sign in. Both mean almost the same that you can access an account where you are already registered.

Registration

Registration is an optional feature that allows anyone (or specified domains) to join and register to the workspace on their own.

The act of registering for a new account is known as registration. Different web portals may use different words for returning users, but the act of first-time registration is always referred to as "sign up." It simply implies creating a new account, whether it's for a portal, an application, or a newsletter. When you wish to access some portal or application for the very first time, you need to register.

 For example, you need to register before you can access your Gmail account which requires you to fill in your details like name, address, email ID, contact number, and a password to log in. If you are not a registered user already, you are always required to register. For example, if you want to access Facebook and to know what it’s all about, you have to register first so that you can log in with your credentials from next time onwards as a returning user.

What is a subscriber to a website?

Subscriber

The subscriber to a website is the person who has subscribed for the service of the Website.

If you operate a publicly available website, anyone can visit and read the content that you’ve produced. Visitors who want a full experience, on the other hand, can subscribe.

Subscribers are unable to create, delete, or edit posts and pages, delete comments or change your site's administration settings. Subscribers can do, however, is create and modify their profile. Each Subscriber gets their own dashboard in order to create or modify their profile

Individuals who visit your site on a frequent basis may want to build a profile and become a Subscriber so that they may instantly identify themselves every time they visit. Subscribers are typical visitors who like to leave comments on your website, but they can also choose to sign up for additional content such as a newsletter or other posts/pages that require a visitor to create a profile before viewing the content.

Anyone who has signed up to get email updates from your website, your newsletter, and/or updates from your website's RSS feed is referred to as a "subscriber" with lowercase "s" in general terms.

What is Login Form?

A login form is used to submit authentication credentials in order to gain access to a secure website or form. A field for the username and another for the password can be found on the login form. When the login form is submitted its underlying code checks that the credentials are authentic, giving the user can access to the restricted page.  A user will not be allowed to advance past the login form if they are unable to give legitimate credentials.

Login Form Properties

Click on one of the glyphs under the Data tab of the Properties window or on the name of the login form in the Project Explorer to reveal the login form properties. Because a login form is a subtype of a record form, its characteristics are identical to those of a record form, though the majority of them are left blank.

Name

The form's name must be unique.

Connection

This field is left blank because a login form does not retrieve data from the database. The database settings defined in the Security tab of the Project Settings dialogue window are used by the Login form.

Source Type

A login form does not retrieve data from the database so this property is left blank.

Data Source

This parameter is left blank because a login form does not get data from the database.

Return Page

After successfully logging in, the visitor will be forwarded to this page. If the user was attempting to access a password-protected page or form, they will be forwarded to that page before being sent to the login page.

Remove Parameters

Specify a list of form or URL parameters that should not be propagated when the form is submitted in a common separated list.

Convert URL To

Specify whether the URL should be transformed to an absolute URL or a secure URL (https://) for the SSL protocol.

Restricted

Because the user must be able to access the login form, this property should always be set to No. Otherwise, the user will be unable to login.

Allow Insert

This property is always set to No since the login form does not handle database content.

Allow Update

Because the login form does not handle database content, this parameter is always set to No.

Allow Delete

Because login form does not handle database content, this attribute is always set to No.

Preserve Parameters           

When the form is submitted, specify whether Get or Post parameters should be maintained.

Custom Insert Type

Because login form does not handle database content, this attribute is always set to No.

Custom Insert          

Because login form does not handle database content, this attribute is always set to No.

Custom Update Type

Because login form does not handle database content, this attribute is always set to No.

Custom Update

Because login form does not handle database content, this attribute is always set to No.

Custom Delete Type

Because login form does not handle database content, this attribute is always set to No.

Custom Delete

Because login form does not handle database content, this attribute is always set to No.

Login Form Actions

Because a login form is a scaled-down version of a record form, it must include a unique characteristic that sets it apart from other record forms. This unique characteristic is implemented as a Login action, which is attached to the OnClick Server event of the login form's Login button.

The Login action updates the page with code. When the Login button is hit, the new code invokes the Code Charge function, which performs the authentication and redirects the user depending on the result of the login attempt. When you use the Authentication Builder to create a login form, the Login action is immediately added to the button. If you're manually building the form, you can add the Login action to the Login button's OnClick event by selecting it from the list of available actions.

When you use the Authentication Builder to create a Login form, you can additionally add a SetFocus action that sets focus to the first field in the form. This action is added to the OnLoad client event of the page that contains the login form. The action code sets the pointer to the first field in the login form when the page loads at runtime, allowing the user to begin typing without having to manually move the cursor to the field.

Related Post